Question: Is Addison’S Disease Serious?

Can you live a normal life with Addison’s disease?

Most people with the condition live a normal lifespan and are able to live an active life, with few limitations.

However, many people with Addison’s disease also find they must learn to manage bouts of fatigue and there may be associated health conditions, such as diabetes or an underactive thyroid..

Can you drive with Addison’s disease?

Driving. If you’re diagnosed with Addison’s disease and have a bus, coach or lorry licence, it’s your legal obligation to inform the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA).

What is the life expectancy of a person with Addison’s disease?

The mean death ages for female and male patients were 75.7 and 64.8 years respectively, which is 3.2 and 11.2 years less than the estimated life expectancy at the time of diagnosis. Sixty patients outlived their expected age and eight patients lived exactly as long as expected at the time of diagnosis.

What happens if Addison’s disease is left untreated?

If Addison’s disease is left untreated, the levels of hormones produced by the adrenal gland gradually decrease in the body. This causes your symptoms to get progressively worse and eventually lead to a life-threatening situation called an adrenal or Addisonian crisis.

What triggers Addison’s disease?

Addison’s disease is caused by an autoimmune response, which occurs when the body’s immune system (which protects it from infection) assaults its own organs and tissues. With Addison’s disease, the immune system attacks the outer portion of the adrenal glands (the cortex), where cortisol and aldosterone are made.

Can Addison disease be cured?

Addison’s disease cannot be cured but can be significantly improved with hormone replacement therapy and the avoidance of common triggers. If treated properly, Addison’s disease can be brought under control and you can be better assured of living a long and healthy life.